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The Auditory

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  • January 31, 2012 4:51 pm
    Dr. Gerre Hancock (above) died last week at the age of 77. He was choirmaster and organist at Saint Thomas Fifth Avenue in New York from 1971 until 2004. Often he was accompanied at the organ by his faithful wife Judith. His time there was spent enhancing a beautiful tradition of music spanning back nearly 100 years. Gerre was known for his inspired improvisations, and overall energy with the choir which he dearly loved.
Saint Thomas is having a Solemn Requiem Service on Saturday featuring music from the choir. The service will start out with nine (yes, nine) organ preludes. Works spanning from Bach to Dr. Hancock’s own pieces and more. The sung service will be the Duruflé Requiem. More information will be posted on the church’s website throughout the week.

    Dr. Gerre Hancock (above) died last week at the age of 77. He was choirmaster and organist at Saint Thomas Fifth Avenue in New York from 1971 until 2004. Often he was accompanied at the organ by his faithful wife Judith. His time there was spent enhancing a beautiful tradition of music spanning back nearly 100 years. Gerre was known for his inspired improvisations, and overall energy with the choir which he dearly loved.

    Saint Thomas is having a Solemn Requiem Service on Saturday featuring music from the choir. The service will start out with nine (yes, nine) organ preludes. Works spanning from Bach to Dr. Hancock’s own pieces and more. The sung service will be the Duruflé Requiem. More information will be posted on the church’s website throughout the week.

  • January 24, 2012 1:31 am
    "To achieve great things, two things are needed; a plan, and not quite enough time."
- Leonard Bernsteain

    "To achieve great things, two things are needed; a plan, and not quite enough time."

    - Leonard Bernsteain

  • January 9, 2012 3:01 pm

    twentyfourbit:

    The Shins: “Simple Song”

    Our first taste of Port of Morrow, James Mercer’s first record as the Shins since 2007’s Wincing the Night Away, is here in the form of “Simple Song.” Hear Mercer lead his brand new lineup through the catchy cut above.

  • January 8, 2012 12:49 pm

    realfaustus:

    Seriously, if you haven’t checked this guy out, you need to right now. He put out 3 EP’s last year and all of them are amazing. The combination of classic Motown style with such a beautifully raw voice make this guy really special. Definitely my favorite new artist of 2012 so far. 

    (Source: youtube.com)

  • January 7, 2012 8:55 am
    leadingtone:

Manuscript of Brahms’ Ave Maria for women’s choir and orchestra, Op. 12. It was his first choral-orchestral work, premiered by the Frauenchor of Hamburg which he directed for some time as a young man. 
Have you heard the story about Brahms and the chorus girls up in the tree? It involves booze and the police. He loved to tell that one.
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    leadingtone:

    Manuscript of Brahms’ Ave Maria for women’s choir and orchestra, Op. 12. It was his first choral-orchestral work, premiered by the Frauenchor of Hamburg which he directed for some time as a young man. 

    Have you heard the story about Brahms and the chorus girls up in the tree? It involves booze and the police. He loved to tell that one.

  • January 7, 2012 8:51 am

    City Opera of the Future?

    The Times put out an interesting article the other day suggesting some paths for the reinvention of the New York City Opera. It compares it to some of the up and comping companies starting around the city such as Gotham Chamber Opera – the same company that premiered Nico Muhly’s new opera “Dark Sister”. While inspiring and wonderful to see new companies rise, the City Opera has an establishment appeal that it should use for good.

    While the City Opera has gone through some tough patches in the past few years, they are not yet dead. With cutting its budget for singers and production, leaving its home in Lincoln Center, the door is wide open for local freelance musicians, artist and directors to leave a new mark on the opera world.

    There are plenty of people throughout the New York area that can support productions, with the right push. Its apparent. What City Opera has is an incredible opportunity to fill a void left by the Met.

    While the Met is broadening its horizons with HD broadcasts and new productions that push the envelope (some that have scare the white hairs away) they are left without some of the staple productions, which at the time of their runs, were the best world. New productions of Tosca and Don Giovanni at the Met, operas of supreme importance to the opera world, have all but flopped under the new vision of Peter Gelb.

    The New York City Opera needs not to be concerned with cost. We know the money is there (somewhere). It is just a matter of finding the right person(s) that will actually invest or help find investors to build a local, cultural alternative to the Met.

    City Opera needs to find artists and musicians who are willing to create a contrasting alternative to the vastly left field direction that the Met is taking (I don’t mean that negatively). As Wolfe mentioned in the article, there needs to be a solid outlet for young singers and musicians in New York and that simply doesn’t exist with the Met organization.

    The folks over at NYCO have an unbelievable chance to become reacquainted with their NYC roots and help develop performing arts around the area. They need to focus on outreach as well as building inspiring productions in cooperation with the resources that exist throughout the area. With the right nudge and some open thinking, anything can happen.

    (Source: realfaust.us)

  • January 7, 2012 8:49 am